Aarhus modules

Year 1 in Aarhus - 5 foundational modules

During the 5 first-year modules students gain thorough knowledge about the economic, political, social and cultural contexts of globalisation and journalism, and learn to creatively apply concepts, methods, principles and theories to the study of and practices within global media and journalism. 

The first module, Reporting Global Change, builds a bridge between students’ journalistic experiences and the conceptual framework of academic analyses of globalisation. After expanding this framework from within political science and media studies the focus shifts towards methodologies of research and to a more analytical journalism. 

Module 1 // Reporting Global Change // 10 ECTS

The purpose of this module is to introduce the students to theory, methodology and some of the tools of research, and to introduce how global change is reported.

Module Facts

Semester/term: Autumn
University:
Danish School of Media and Journalism
Credits: 10 ECTS
Professor: Roger Buch

Learning Outcome

Knowledge:

  • Ability to identify different theories and their usefulness
  • Show awareness of national identities and political cultures
  • Appreciate different theories of international change and globalisation


Qualifications:

  • Understand how media report internationally
  • Understand media processes as a mix of actor strategies and structural constraints and possibilities
  • Understand how theories of international politics can be used in journalistic research

Competences:

  • Be able to critically read and research within the discipline of international politics.
  • Will know how to analyse, will know the major sources and will know how to access information
  • Be able to write articles reflecting this insight


Methods of Teaching and Assessment

The module is based on essays, group discussions, workshops, lectures and a final exam paper. The module grade is based on the final exam paper.

Indicative Reading List

  • Baylis et al. The Globalization of World Politics, Oxford University Press, 2014
  • Georg Sørensen, Rethinking the New World Order? Palgrave, 2016
  • Jan Aart Scholte, “Defining Globalization”, in Scholte, Globalization, Palgrave 2 ed. New York 2005

Module 2 // Social Science Methods for Journalists //10 ECTS

The main purposes of this module are: to teach students to (1) assess methodological aspects of social science studies and journalistic presentations; (2) frame questions and develop research designs; (3) assess, select and apply different methods for cross-sectional, case-comparison and case-based study designs and analyses; and (4) make presentations of study results and statistics. Classes will be a mixture of lectures, group assignments, presentations and discussions.

Module Facts

Semester/term: Autumn
University:
Department of Social Science
Credits: 10 ECTS
Professor: Morten Brænder

Learning Outcome

Knowledge:

  • Understand the logic of empirical social science research strategies

  • Understand the criteria for sound empirical social science research

  • Understand the strengths and weaknesses of different empirical social science research strategies


Qualifications:

  • Frame empirical questions

  • Plan research designs to test empirical questions

  • Select and analyse collective study units (cases) such as countries, municipalities, media organisations, schools etc.

  • Plan and complete gathering of interviews, existing documents, questionnaires and existing quantitative data

  • Perform inductive coding, deductive coding and content analysis of text material

  • Perform univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses of quantitative data
 and understand simple analyses based on probability theory


Competences:

  • The ability to critically evaluate various empirical social science research strategies
  • The ability to assess the validity of concrete examples of empirical social scientific research


Methods of Teaching and Assessment

The final exam is a 3-day take-home written exam with aids.

Indicative Reading List

  • Agresti & B. Finlay (2008), Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences, Fourth ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall
  • Babbie, Earl (2010). The practice of Social Research. Twelfth ed. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Company
  • Bryman, Alan (2012) Social Research Methods. Fourth ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • David, Matthew & Carole D. Sutton (2011) Social Research. The Basics. Second ed. Thousand Oaks & New Delhi: Sage Publications 

Module 3 // Globalisation and World Order // 10 ECTS

The aim of the course is to give a comprehensive introduction to the debates about a changing world order. At the end of the Cold War, scholars were discussing the ‘end of history’: the possible triumph of liberal values and the liberal system.

Today, the academic debate about world order is dominated by quite different questions: will some groups of states (meaning the West) have to hand over their international leadership to others (for instance modernising or rising powers like the BRICS)? Are the institutions of international society sufficiently strong to support international order rather than disorder? How can national and international value differences be overcome?

To shed light on these big questions, the course focuses on four inter-related factors which are crucial to world order: Power; Economics; Institutions and Values. The module will be a mixture of lectures, assignments, group work and plenary discussions.

Module Facts

Semester/term: Autumn
University:
Department of Social Science
Credits: 10 ECTS
Professor: Tonny Brems Knudsen & Mette Skak

Learning Outcome

Knowledge:

  • A range of theories on world order
  • Understanding a number of dilemmas, challenges and dynamics originating from power transition, processes of globalisation, institutional bargains and value differences
  • Insight into key fora of governance in international politics the logic of empirical social science research strategies



Qualifications:

  • The ability to uderstand that the power political, economic, institutional and cultural processes of world politics are interlinked and driven by both national and international factors
  • The ability to understand that several competing theories can come up with strong answers to the nature of contemporary world order 


Competences:

  • The ability to critically evaluate various theories in relation to concrete empirical examples as well as other theories
  • The ability to formulate and answer research questions based on various theories
  • The ability to use the knowledge and understanding from this course in a way that leads to a more qualified and more critical journalistic coverage of the field of international politics


Methods of Teaching and Assessment

The module grade is based on the final essay, which is a 10-page essay (4000 words) based on a set question. The student gets 7 days to write this essay.

Indicative Reading List

  • Armijo, Leslie E. and Cynthia Roberts (2014), ‘The Emerging Powers and Global Governance: Why the BRICS Matter’, in Robert Looney (ed.), Handbook of Emerging Economies, New York: Routledge, pp. 503-24
  • Ayoob, Mohammed (2004), ‘Third World Perspectives on Humanitarian Intervention and International Administration’, Global Governance, 10, pp. 99-118
  • Bellamy, Alex J. and Paul D. Williams (2011), ‘The New Politics of protection? Côte d'Ivoire, Libya and the responsibility to protect’, International Affairs, 87:4, pp. 825-850
  • Buzan, Barry (2010), ‘China in International Society: is ‘Peaceful Rise’ Possible?’, The Chinese Journal of International Politics, Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 5-36
  • Buzan, Barry & George Lawson (2014), ‘Capitalism and the emergent world order’, International Affairs, 90:1, pp. 71-91
  • Chan, Steve (2008), ‘China, the U.S., and the Power-Transition Theory: A Critique’, ix-xii, 1-8 Foot, Rosemary (2014), “‘Doing some things’ in the Xi Jinping era: the United Nations as China’s venue of choice’”, International Affairs, 90:5, 1085-1100
  • Fukuyama, Francis (1989), ‘The End of History’, The National Interest 16, 3-18 Huntington, Samuel (1993), ‘Clash of Civilizations?’, Foreign Affairs, 72:3, 22-49
  • Layne, Christopher (2012), ‘This Time It’s Real: The End of Unipolarity and the Pax Americana’, International Studies Quarterly, 56:1, 203-213
  • Luttwak, Edward N. (1990), ‘From Geopolitics to Geo-Economics’, The National Interest, 20: Summer, 17-23 Mearsheimer,
  • John J. (2014), ‘Why the Ukraine Crisis Is the West’s Fault: The Liberal Delusions That Provoked Putin’, Foreign Affairs, 93:5, 77-89
  • Thakur, Ramesh (2013), ‘R2P after Libya and Syria: Engaging Emerging Powers’, The Washington Quarterly, 36:2, Spring, 61-76

Module 4 // Analytical Journalism // 10 ECTS

This module aims to enable students to produce knowledge on a complex issue as a deliberative input in a selected news discourse by using the methodology of this module. Teaching will demonstrate tools for creating alternative explanatory representations of reality in a compelling and trustworthy journalistic manner.

The teaching combines approaches from different disciplines as social science, rhetoric and journalism. The tools are exercised through presentations, workshops and set assignments.

Module Facts

Semester/term: Spring
University:
 Danish School of Media and Journalism
Credits: 10 ECTS
Professor: Flemming Tait Svith

Learning Outcome

In journalism practise the ability to:

  • Integrate scholarly and journalistic methodologies
  • Formulate, structure and develop processes of creating knowledge
  • Account for the relation between theoretical concepts and the journalistic practice
  • Nuance the news media representation of complex and international issues


Methods of Teaching and Assessment

The exam assignment consists of a journalistic analytical feature and a so-called meta report, which is a structured account, where the student demonstrates how the tools of this seminar shape the student’s analytical feature. The exam is a two-week exam of 11-13 pages.

The Mundus Collections

The Mundus Collection is a challenging and thought-provoking compilation of stories produced by students during the Mundus Journalism programme's second semester module Analytical Journalism. What started off as a journalism class assignment, eventually turned into a series of analytical features covering stories from around the world.

The Mundus Collection is a unique set of articles exploring stories of the East, the West, and the wider world. The writers of these stories belong to many different nationalities and cultural identities, which make their perspectives both interesting and intriguing. ​

In writing these stories, these journalists were told to embrace a deeper style of journalism, looking beyond news hooks and well-known conflicts to broach complex solutions. These are long stories, ideal for leisurely reading, touching on science, law and economics, and they will bring you around the world, combining the best of expert opinion and local knowledge.

In doing so, they also highlight the need for journalism that goes beyond local media and seeks out something greater: a global consciousness, and a global style of journalism.

Please look into our Mundus Collections from 2011 to 2016:

Indicative Reading List

  • Blackstone, Amy (2013). Principles of Sociological Inquiry: Qualitative and Quantitative Methods, v. 1.0, pp. 29-47 • Brinkmann, Svend (2012). ”The epistemology of working with everyday life materials” pp. 32-51 in Qualitative Inquiry in Everyday Life, Los Angeles: Sage
  • David, Matthew & Carole D. Sutton (2011/2004). "Research question, operationalization and variables" pp. 216-221 in Social Research. An Introduction, Los Angeles: Sage
  • de Vreese, C. H. (2005). News framing: Theory and typology, Information Design Journal + Document Design, 13 (1), 48-59
  • Entman, Robert M. (1993). "Framing. Toward Clarification of a Fractured Paradigm", in Journal of Communication, Vol. 43, No. 4, 51-58
  • Fairclough, Norman (2008/2003). Analysing discourse. Textual analysis for social research, London: Routledge, pp. 159-173
  • Isaksson, Maria & Jørgensen, Poul Erik Flyvholm: Communicating Corporate Ethos on the Web: The Self-Presentation of PR Agencies, Journal of Business Communication 2010, Vol. 47, 2, 119-140
  • Jensen, Klaus Bruhn (2010). Media Convergence. The three degrees of network, mass and interpersonal communication, London: Routledge, pp. 131-139
  • Jepperson, Ronald & John W. Meyer (2011). "Multiple Levels of Analysis and the Limitations of Methodological Individualisms", Sociological Theory, 29(1): 60–66
  • Lawrence, Regina G. (2010). "Researching Political News Framing: Established Ground and New Horizons", pp. 265-285 in Paul D'Angelo & Jim A Kuypers (edt.) Doing News Framing Analysis, New York: Routledge
  • Lowland, John, David Snow, Leon Anderson & Lyn H. Lofland (2006). Analyzing Social Settings. A Guide to Qualitative Observation and Analysis (4. ed), Thomson Wadsworth, pp. 121-122, 156-164
  • Mayes, G. Randolph (2010). Argument-Explanation Complementarity and the Structure of Informal Reasoning, Informal Logic 30 (1): 92-111
  • Miles, Matthew B., A. Michael Huberman & Johnny Saldaña (2011). "Methods of explaining", pp. 221-255 in Qualitative Data Analysis, London: Sage
  • Rich, Carole (2010). Writing and Reporting News, Sixth Edition, Wadsworth,, pp. 131-133, 145-156, 183-194, 199-218 Salgado,
  • Susana & Jesper Strömbäck (2011). Interpretive journalism: A review of concepts, operationalizations and key findings, Journalism 13(2) 144–161
  • Scanlan, Christopher (2000). Reporting and Writing, Harcourt College Publishers, pp. 73-74, 87-92, 126-144, 160-164
  • Turner, Jonathan H. (2013/2005). "A New Approach for Theoretically Integrating Micro and Macro Analysis" pp. 405-424 in Craig Calhoun & Chris Rojek & Bryan Turner (edt.). The SAGE Handbook of Sociology, London: SAGE Publications Ltd Examples of Students' Work: 2014 2015

Module 5 // Media and Journalism Research in the Context of Globalisation // 20 ECTS

This module aims to explore a range of scholarly debates that address the ways in which the media, journalism practices as well as the consumption of news are interlinked with wider processes of social change in contemporary societies.

Central to these discussions will be the examination of the following three key issues: 1) The roles of the media and journalism in the establishment, maintenance of and challenges to communities and identities within processes of globalisation; 2) The strengths and weaknesses of different research-based approaches to media, journalism and journalists; 3) The cross-cultural contexts and evolving nature of news production and consumption and the broader implications of these to journalism as a profession and societies in general.

Based on material from this module and the students’ knowledge of research methodologies from the preceding module (Social Science Methods for Journalists), students will be guided to formulate, develop and carry out small but relevant research projects on issues concerning contemporary media and journalism. Classes will be a mixture of lectures, group assignments. student presentations and discussions.

Module Facts

Semester/term: Spring
University:
 School of Communication and Culture - Media and Journalism Studies
Credits: 20 ECTS
Professor: Henrik Bødker & Teke Jacob Ngomba

Learning Outcome

Knowledge:

  • A range of theories related to the cultural roles of the media and journalism in relation to globalisation and the methodologies underlying these theories
  • The main research-based approaches to journalism (from political science, sociology, history, etc.) and how these contribute to the public construction of journalism
  • The key issues related to the spread and use of digital media as far as journalism and processes of globalization are concerned


Qualifications:

  • The ability to understand the main theoretical discussions with regards to the relationship between media, journalism and globalisation and the interplay of these as concerns a range of political and socio-cultural issues
  • The ability to understand everyday professional practices of journalists and contemporary developments in the media from relevant theoretical perspectives
  • The ability to understand the cross-cultural specificities/determinants as concerns the perception, roles and impacts of the media and journalism across the world


Competences:

  • The ability to critically evaluate various theories and empirical studies relating to the relationship between media, journalism and globalissation
  • The ability to formulate relevant research questions based on this knowledge
  • The ability to transform these research questions into methodologically appropriate research designs as well as to implement such designs and communicate findings in proper academic formats


Methods of Teaching and Assessment

The final exam is a research based, individual essay (20-22 pages of 2,400 characters per page including spaces) that addresses any issue concerning media and journalism. The students will have two weeks to write and submit the essay, which will be graded by the course instructor(s) and an external examiner.

Indicative Reading List

  • Anderson, B. (1991) [1983]. Imagined Communities. London: Verso
  • Castells, M. (2009). Communication Power. Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Löffelholz, M. and Weaver, D. (Eds.) (2008). Global Journalism Research: Theories, Methods, Findings, Future. Danvers, MA: Blackwell
  • Kraidy, M. (2005). Hybridity or the Cultural Logic of Globalization. Philadelphia: Temple University Press
  • Obijiofor, L. and Hanusch, F. (2011). Journalism across Cultures: An Introduction. London: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Peters, C and Broersma, M. (2012) Rethinking Journalism: Trust and Participation in a Transformed News Landscape. London: Routledge
  • Shoemaker, P. and Reese, S. (2014). Mediating the Message in the 21st Century: A Media Sociology Perspective. New York. London. Routledge
  • Wahl-Jorgensen, K. and Hanitzsch, T. (2009). (Eds.) The Handbook of Journalism Studies. New York, London: Routledge
  • Ward, Stephen (ed.) (2010) Global Journalism Ethics. McGill-Queen’s University Press: Montreal & Kingston
  • Williams, K. (2011). International Journalism. London: Sage

In addition to the above, articles from international journals/newsletters will be used regularly during the course

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